Every so often we come across an artist that captures the imagination, inspires us, or blows us away with their innovative use of media. We asked a few of these artists to share their creative process and secrets of technique, which we’ve recorded here so that others (including us) can learn and in turn draw inspiration from them. This demonstration comes courtesy of Elizabeth Botté , who took part in one of our series of One Word, One Day (OWOD) events. OWOD is a collaboration between Micador Group, the Australian Society of Authors and the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, with support from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Artists have one day to produce a work of art, based on a themed word, using only products supplied by Micador Group. For the Melbourne event, the word artists were tasked to interpret was ‘Fly’. The following is a chronicle of the creation of one piece of art. You can see the completed piece of work in our online gallery, by clicking here. Photography courtesy of Jac Price, at One Word One Day Melbourne.

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Step 1

After just a quick sketch with pencil and paper, Elizabeth started work on the main piece using a sheet of Roymac Rains Watercolour Paper.
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Step 2

Using a marker, Elizabeth drew a pair of flies freehand, along with a large semi-circle defining the lower right hand of the page.
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Step 3

Improvising as she went, Elizabeth then used a piece of folded over paper as a ruler, to draw several straight lines which intersected to make boxes in the lower left corner.
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Step 4

Switching to a ruler she ruled a few lines and inked in a flourish of calligraphic text, using the inbuilt nib of a Koh-I-Noor-Drawing Ink Pot.
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Step 5

She then used a selection of Koh-I-Noor inks to create the colour-block details in the lower left corner, text at the bottom of the page as well as planes and the figures of flying women in the top right.
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Step 6

Using the ruler, Elizabeth started to draw lines from a central point in the semi-circle outwards, mimicking the lines a sextant makes and creating a graphic design effect reminiscent of old-fashioned aeronautical travel.
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Step 7

Following the navigational theme, she used a Micador Stay Anywhere Permanent Pen to add more circles, text boxes and markers of measurement across the work.
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Step 8

Using the ink pots, she continued to add fine detail and spot colour, continuing to improvise as she went.
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Step 9

Once Elizabeth had completed the intricate dark ink and pen line work, she brought out the coloured ink pots and used a Roymac Future Brush along with watered down ink to flood the negative space created by the gridlock on lines and graphical motifs.
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Step 10

The final work is a fascinating collage of disparate themes and graphical techniques, brought into cohesion by the stirring and moody ink work.
Download this info as a takeaway PDF