Every so often we come across an artist that captures the imagination, inspires us, or blows us away with their innovative use of media. We asked a few of these artists to share their creative process and secrets of technique, which we’ve recorded here so that others (including us) can learn and draw inspiration from them. This demonstration comes courtesy of Jacqueline Grantford, who took part in one of our series of One Word, One Day (OWOD) events. OWOD is a collaboration between Micador Group, the Australian Society of Authors and the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, with support from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Artists have one day to produce a work of art, based on a themed word, usingonly products supplied by Micador Group. For the Melbourne event, theword artists were tasked to interpret was ‘Fly’. The following is a chronicle of the creation of one piece of art. You can see the completed piece of work in our online gallery, by clicking here.

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Step 1:

Start by drawing a tiny triangle with a curve, like a slice of pizza.
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Step 2:

Draw an anchor underneath the pizza slice, then a wavy circles around the anchor.
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Step 3:

Give the bear two dots for eyes and draw another wavy circle, two eyes, and two squiggly ears for his face, as well as a big oval and four wavy circles for the bear’s legs and arms.
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Step 4:

Once the basic bear is drawn, you can change it's expression just by altering the angle of it's eyebrows. Here's a sheepish bear and an angry bear.
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Step 5:

For this portrait, once Jacqui had sketched her bear with smiling eyes and a pair of cherub's wings, she mixed an assortment of acrylic paints to get a palette of browns and off-whites
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Step 6:

Using a round Micador Achiever Brush, Jacqui dabbed on tiny patches of colour that overlapped to give the impression of a soft, cuddly bear flying through a cloudy sky.
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Step 7:

Here you can see Jacqui using the fast-drying quality of acrylic paint to build up layers of pigment for texture and juxtaposition of colour.
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The Completed Work

Here's the completed work, which began with some humble lines in graphite pencil and grew into a work as accomplished as it is adorable.
Download this info as a takeaway PDF