And now for something completely different; Ray Fraser took a playful, inspirational approach to making an artwork with the second MAD Box Challenge. After finishing it, he said that his creation took him by surprise, so you can only imagine how we felt when he sent us a life size, working crocodile for his entry in the second MAD BOX Challenge: Finger Paint Edition. Here, he shows us how to make one at home out of household objects.

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Step1: Make your colour scheme

Ray began by testing the texture of Micador Easy Wash FingerPaint. He dipped a finger and dabbed fingerprints onto scrap paper. By mixing red, green and a little blue he achieved a muddy brown colour that reminded him of scales. Clearly, the logical thing to do was make a CROCODILE.
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Step 2: Create the body

Ray sketched the limbs of the crocodile onto scrap paper to make a template for the body. Next he placed five Micador Create It Art Boards in a row and cut them into body parts for the crocodile, using the scrap paper templates as a guide.
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Step 3: Create the tail and head

By cutting one piece diagonally he found he could make the tail and have trimmings left over for the head and lower jaw. Two complete art boards were used to make the body.
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Step 4: Create the details

Next, he fashioned the eye-sockets from toilet roll tubes, with pupils made of mirror, while the nostrils and spines for the tail were made from a squashed egg carton. These were glued into place with craft glue.
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Step 5: Paint the body

Now that the croc was beginning to take shape, Ray swathed the upper parts in yellow finger paint and the bottom jaw in red. Once they were dry, he started dabbing fingerprints sized scales of green and blue finger paint onto the tail which developed into a sort of rainbow.
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Step 6: Create the Jaw

The crocodile’s teeth were cut out from cardboard and glued firmly into place. When they were dry, Ray painted the edge of the crocodile’s mouth blue. To create a working jaw, Ray joined the two halves of the head together using a scrap of yoga mat. This made a flexible hinge for the jaw and resulted in a satisfying chomping action.
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Step 7: Assemble the crocodile

Next, he punched holes in the pivot points of the croc’s joints and joined the segments together using small nuts and bolts, then reinforced them on the blindside with cloth tape.
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Step 8: Make a hanging frame

Finally, to give the croc a realistic walking action, Ray made a hanging frame from bamboo and wire which he secured the limbs to with heavy elastic. This step, along with the articulated joints, made the croc a kind of marionette. Ray could hold it up and shake it to make it wriggle as though it were walking.
Download this info as a takeaway PDF